The Mother Tree Network (MTN) provides support to First Nations and other communities wanting to practice regenerative forest stewardship. MTN connects communities to experts, information, and tools; offers in-community scientific research, education, and planning support; and provides networking opportunities between communities. We also act as a knowledge hub, sharing information about forests with larger audiences, including the public, governments, industry, non-governmental organizations, and academia.

The Mother Tree Network’s purpose is to protect, restore, and transform the stewardship of forests in British Columbia. The network grew out of the ground-breaking research of founding director and renowned forest ecologist Dr. Suzanne Simard, and her Mother Tree Project at the University of British Columbia. We bring together researchers, Indigenous partners, and a circle of collaborators to help make the transition to regenerative forest stewardship and alternative forest economies.

Regenerative Forest Stewardship is an emerging concept: we envision it as ecosystem-based forest management, guided by Indigenous communities, using Indigenous and western science, that prioritizes ecosystem health, including carbon sequestration and storage, in addition to other eco-cultural and socio-economic goals. It includes: protection of old-growth and primary forests, innovative forest stewardship, restoration of damaged forests, and pro-forestation.

Using a variety of strategies, First Nations are regaining governance of forests. Many are looking to manage forests differently and are seeking information to support their decision-making. They want to use Indigenous and Western science to manage forests to restore ecological functions, optimize carbon sequestration/storage, maintain biodiversity, guard against fire, protect water flows and food systems, enhance cultural values, and provide economic opportunities. The Mother Tree Network supports First Nations to implement their regenerative forest stewardship vision.

To learn more about MTN or to donate visit: www.mothertreenetwork.org.